Mail Art in Summer 2015

For the past few months there has been a wide selection of Mail Art coming in, responding to the centenary of WW1 , with some contributors contemplating  emotionally to the lives lost.

James Wilkinson

James Wilkinson

James Wilkinson, UK plays on the North Eastern dialect with his ‘Wor Dead’ (Our Dead).  A simple but powerful piece.

Petrolpetal

Petrolpetal

Petrolpetal,  South Africa created this ghostly piece of Mail Art from found lace & gesso.  As a printmaker, it reminds me of the beginnings of a Collograph.  The surface is primed with shellac before printing intaglio or relief.

KS Chambers

KS Chambers

KS Chambers

KS Chambers

KS Chambers

KS Chambers

           KS Chambers, USA presents three pieces of Mail Art depicting animals with sinister and disturbing connotations.  Appearing at first to be innocent looking images of animals, objects of power & destruction are placed next to the animals, creating a new narrative.

Jane Kennelly

Jane Kennelly

Jane Kennelly

Jane Kennelly

Jane Kennelly, UK responds to the WW1 theme using family research, to create a poem reflecting on the death of  a family member. ‘Pieced’, uses the language of a seamstress to present a moving poem of loss & love.  The poem could be applied to any nationality  effected by war, it has a universal impact, bridging markers of time and history.

Ryosuke Cohen

Ryosuke Cohen

Hundreds of contributors from all around the world make up the Japanese Mail Artists work of Ryosuke Cohen.  Mail Artists engaging with Cohen become part of his narrative through selection and reproduction, appearing as an address, stamps and icon his multiple works.

Finally, the most prolific producer of Mail Art in the form of stamps & posters, Otto Sherman, has generously contributed a whole a range and quantity of work responding to the devastation & destruction of war.  Young people taking part in the WW1 Mail art project re-configured Sherman’s stamps into zines & mail art, sharing their work with other young people in Hartlepool, Germany & Australia.  Check out Otto Sherman’s page HERE.

This Young Roots HLF funded project continues to attract new contributors and interest from history groups, mail artists and anyone curious about the social narratives behind WW1 and participatory arts practice. If you want to contribute some Mail Art, post your work to:

Theresa Easton, Ouseburn Warehouse Workshop & Studios, 36 Lime Street, Ouseburn, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 2PQ.

HLFNL_BLK

 

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One thought on “Mail Art in Summer 2015

  1. Some great work here Theresa. Particularly drawn to the bookish structure and haunting nature of Jane Kennelly’s work.

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