Mail art from Belgium and thoughts from South Africa

I recently received this piece of Mail Art by Marie-Christine De Grave, based in Belgium.

Her work, although simply made, using much recycled material and found pictures, resonates with sensitivity and reflection.

Marie-Christine De Grave

Marie-Christine De Grave

Images of shells,’bombs’ and the associated machinery  clearly depict the nature of war and are images I am drawn to out of a curiosity and need to understand the social aspects of WW1 .  Brass artillery shells were produced in their millions; they represent the defining weapon of WW1.

Someone - Edition size 18

Someone – Edition size 18

‘Someone made this’ forms part of an international collaborative book project, initiated by South African artist Cheryl Penn.   This handmade book references Trench Art, particularly brass artillery shells. I am interested in how Trench Art objects have become  historical documents, that illustrate and enshrine the war time lives of its makers, whether munition workers or soldiers.  I have begun to explore this awareness using very basic printing techniques to make ‘Someone made this’.  I am interested in referencing the crude handmade tools used to scratch and score into the brass, puncture the surface of the hard metal and mould the canister shape.  

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PetrolPetal takes a light hearted look at Mail Art, sending me  a highly decorated envelope  which intrigues the viewer, escalating the need to know, ‘What is inside the envelope’?

PetrolPetal intriguing envelope

PetrolPetal intriguing envelope

What is in the envelope?

What is in the envelope?

Empty

Empty

I like PetrolPetal’s approach to her Mail Art, the work is very interactive and certainly engaging – I am looking forward to her next posting….

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Mail Art in – The Celestial Scribe & Guido Vermeulen

From alternative corners of the earth, a visual response to WW1.  Guido Vermeulen based in Belgium, questions who sponsored WW1?

Guido Vermeulen

Guido Vermeulen

Research indicates USA Banks and the British aristocracy, members of the international banking system.  Or did the pennies donated by working class families contribute to the funding of munitions? Or was sponsorship in the form of  coal excavated from the pits of Durham, used to fuel the the ships exporting iron ore from Scandinavia  to Germany to make the submarines?  Questions such as this, ‘Who sponsored WW1’ unearths more questions and contradictions.

Guido Vermeulen

Guido Vermeulen

The Celestial Scribe, based in Brazil, offers a different perspective.

The Celestial Scribe

The Celestial Scribe

The image reminds me of a piece of folk art or even trench art, made up of recycled materials and found ephemera.

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Celestial Scribe, Republik Van Patiland – a City of Peace.

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Memoriam Omnibus Paul Wager

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Memoriam Omnibus is the principle sculpture in a series of work called Reflections on War by  Hartlepool based artist Paul Wager.

Reflections on War include paintings as well as sculptures.

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Memoriam Omnibus bronze, edition 12, 2014, 85x85x290cms, cast by Pangolin Editions UK

Unlike conventional war memorials, Ominbus is a neutral statement in which I have tried to avoid patriotic sentiment.  Thematic interrelationships of objects are predominant in both Omnibus and the RoW series. These objects may appear different, even unrelated, but their combination creates a new form. My intended principle themes are tragedy, reconciliation and the futility of war. Paul Wager ‘The Jackdaw’ November/December 2013

Paul Wager

Paul Wager

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Mail Art in E Coles

Beautifully stitched envelope by E.Coles.  Inside the envelope apiece of collaged Mail Art.  I love E.Coles sense of composition.

EColes1Ecoles2

Unknown Mail Art.  If there is anyone out there who is able to claim this piece of work – please do get intouch.

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From Canada, this piece of Mail art leaves me feeling uncomfortable and unsettled.  I would like to find out more about the work and the creator.  Mail Art in February 2014.

Dieter Lochle

Dieter Lochle

Dieter Lochle

Dieter Lochle brings not only soil and seeds to Hartlpool but ”a constructive proposal on how an artistic effort could lead to a reconciliatory effect between individuals of the two nations concerned – present day England and nowadays Germany”

Working in partnership with longstanding fellow artist Gavin Mayhew, Lochle presents the question “What is it, that makes a day a “GLAD DAY”?  The intention is to ”stimulate interest among young folks for what Germans of today are like or think – so I asked a simple question, hoping to be able to create a communicative platform”

Dieter Lochle

Dieter Lochle

Lochle, along with Gavin Mayhew  they will present an exhibition of work in Hartlepool  in July 2014, with talks and workshops throughout the summer.

Dieter Lochle

Dieter Lochle

 

Dieter Lochle

Dieter Lochle

Otto Sherman Mail Art in

Otto Sherman is one of the most influential artists of the Stamp Art Movement.  An award winning Illustrator and graphic designer in his earlier years, much of his work, then, was singularly focused on his signature style of big animated gestural forms and highly saturated chroma.

Otto Sherman
Otto Sherman

Today Sherman’s work as a Stamp Artist blends a distinctive artistic style of surreal masquerade with incisive emotionally charged social critique, he integrates these disparate contrasting themes in his art with startling results. by exposing societal decadence,corruption, and the malevolent power of dictators over unfortunate people, together with randomly juxtaposed Heraldry and Medalling, (a recurring theme) these, are the two defining visual narratives, central to his work. Sherman brings Hans Holbein’s King Henry the VIII to the 21st century in strident bling, bejewled, bedazzled, bewitched, and a little worse for wear. Alastaire Brown

Otto Sherman
Otto Sherman
Otto Sherman
Otto Sherman