Heugh Battery Remembers those bombed out of their homes & workplace

 

Hartlepool Sixth Form College

Hartlepool Sixth Form College

Every year The Heugh Battery Museum on The Headland in Hartlepool, remembers the events of 16th December 1914 when the Hartlepools were shelled by German ships from the North Sea.

This year the community came  together for the 101st time to remember those who lost their lives in the barrage of shells; the children who were injured or died as they were getting ready for school, shift workers making their way home after work and fishermen petrified and frozen with fear out at sea, stranded in ‘no mans land’ as shells flew over their heads.

This years commemoration at the Heugh included  a series of plays by  students from Hartlepool Sixth Form College with an evocative performance in the Heugh Battery itself.  Students presented an emotive response to the legacy of the bombardment, loss, fear and separation.  As Britain contributes yet more bombs to its 4th war in 14 years, its the next generation who are growing up knowing only aggression as a response to  international disagreement.  The students production displayed sensitivity, maturity and hope for the future.

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Hartlepool Remembered were there talking to visitors about how they can contribute their memories to the Centenary Memorial Scrap Book.  If you would like to get involved contact theresa_easton@yahoo.co.uk

Speakers and performers at the Heugh all contributed to a commemorative day, with visitors braving the Headland wind to listen to heritage research carried out in the near by village of Hart, rebellious Colliery men recreated to dig tunnels at the front and musical performance by the talented Fools Gold.

Launching the same day, a new permanent dedicated gallery at the Museum of Hartlepool at Hartlepool’s Maritime Experience to the bombardment of the Hartlepools.

Hartlepool Remembered: Legacies of the Bombardment

Hartlepool Remembered: Legacies of the Bombardment at the Heugh Battery Museum

Part of the commemoration events of the bombing of the Hartlepool’s.

Mail Art by young people in Ratzeburg

Mail Art by young people in Ratzeburg

In the marquee
10.00- 3pm Hartlepool Remembered: Legacies of the Bombardment
This centenary project will run a stall through the day, offering visitors the chance to record details of their families or community groups to be included in the Hartlepool Bombardment Centenary Scrapbook. This book will capture a snapshot of how Hartlepool people remembered the bombardment and commemorated the centenaries. This project, funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, is a collaboration between community groups in Hartlepool and WW1 researchers at the University of Leeds.

Theresa Easton will be on hand helping visitors make their contribution to the Hartlepool Bombardment Centenary Scrapbook.

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Hartlepool Bombardment Centenary Scrapbook

Hartlepool Bombardment Centenary Memorial Scrapbook
As the lead artist of Hartlepool Remembered, I am inviting residents and community groups in Hartlepool to take part in community art sessions to document bombardment memories. Funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, the project is now creating a Hartlepool Bombardment Centenary Memorial Scrapbook that will capture experiences and records of the 2014 centenary, inspired by the town’s original Bombardment Memorial Scrapbook, put together a hundred years ago in the weeks following the 1914 bombardment. The Centenary Scrapbook and digitised copies will be deposited in civic archives (including Durham at War) for posterity and we are keen to include as many Hartlepool people, families, groups and organisations as possible.

  •  The sessions will be an opportunity to capture a snapshot of where you were during the 2014 Bombardment Centenary events, which will then be added to this new memorial for the town and its people.
  • The sessions will take place in Hartlepool from November 2015 to July 2016, at a date and time by arrangement. A session for your group will provide the opportunity to document your response to the Bombardment Centenary events using a range of creative skills, including drawing, printing, writing and collaging. We will use selected  WW1 heritage material and you are welcome also to bring your own materials, including any family WWI or Centenary mementoes which can be photographed and included.
  • If you would like to book one of the sessions or would like any further information, please contact theresa_easton@yahoo.co.uk or 07981 381830.

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Mail Art in Summer 2015

For the past few months there has been a wide selection of Mail Art coming in, responding to the centenary of WW1 , with some contributors contemplating  emotionally to the lives lost.

James Wilkinson

James Wilkinson

James Wilkinson, UK plays on the North Eastern dialect with his ‘Wor Dead’ (Our Dead).  A simple but powerful piece.

Petrolpetal

Petrolpetal

Petrolpetal,  South Africa created this ghostly piece of Mail Art from found lace & gesso.  As a printmaker, it reminds me of the beginnings of a Collograph.  The surface is primed with shellac before printing intaglio or relief.

KS Chambers

KS Chambers

KS Chambers

KS Chambers

KS Chambers

KS Chambers

           KS Chambers, USA presents three pieces of Mail Art depicting animals with sinister and disturbing connotations.  Appearing at first to be innocent looking images of animals, objects of power & destruction are placed next to the animals, creating a new narrative.

Jane Kennelly

Jane Kennelly

Jane Kennelly

Jane Kennelly

Jane Kennelly, UK responds to the WW1 theme using family research, to create a poem reflecting on the death of  a family member. ‘Pieced’, uses the language of a seamstress to present a moving poem of loss & love.  The poem could be applied to any nationality  effected by war, it has a universal impact, bridging markers of time and history.

Ryosuke Cohen

Ryosuke Cohen

Hundreds of contributors from all around the world make up the Japanese Mail Artists work of Ryosuke Cohen.  Mail Artists engaging with Cohen become part of his narrative through selection and reproduction, appearing as an address, stamps and icon his multiple works.

Finally, the most prolific producer of Mail Art in the form of stamps & posters, Otto Sherman, has generously contributed a whole a range and quantity of work responding to the devastation & destruction of war.  Young people taking part in the WW1 Mail art project re-configured Sherman’s stamps into zines & mail art, sharing their work with other young people in Hartlepool, Germany & Australia.  Check out Otto Sherman’s page HERE.

This Young Roots HLF funded project continues to attract new contributors and interest from history groups, mail artists and anyone curious about the social narratives behind WW1 and participatory arts practice. If you want to contribute some Mail Art, post your work to:

Theresa Easton, Ouseburn Warehouse Workshop & Studios, 36 Lime Street, Ouseburn, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 2PQ.

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